Review: Ginger and Rosa

When I heard that Elle Fanning, younger sister of Dakota, was hitting the big screen again, following the success of Super 8 and Somewhere, I was more than intrigued.

Not only because she is unbelievably talented at just 14, but in new indie film Ginger and Rosa, Elle’s long locks take on a sincere ginger tinge for the role. Funnily enough, to play the lead role, Ginger.

I mean of course, we were interested, duuuuuuh.

Hmmm, a Ginger that’s ginger? Coincedence? No, it’s not.

But aptly-nicknamed Ginger is a character to admire and fall in love with.

As a teenage girl, I know I wasn’t anywhere near as politically aware as I should have been, but this post-war baby is all over it, arranging protests to ban the bomb, consequently landing herself in a jail cell overnight for her beliefs.

She’s extremely conscientious, desperately trying to save the world from disappearing from under her feet, while everyone else around her is going ever so slightly crazy and morally-corrupt.

The plot, written by writer-director Sally Potter, follows the eventual and tragic breakup of a friendship of two teenage girls, Ginger and Rosa.

They’ve been BFFs since birth, with their mothers being besties too. But, as we all know, teen-dom isn’t easy, and as Ginger and Rosa grow up, they grow apart.

More importantly though, Rosa develops a hefty crush on Ginger’s father, which obviously doesn’t go down too well with Ginger’s mum (Christina Hendricks), Rosa’s mum, and Ginger herself.

But despite her obsessive nature towards maturity, saving the world, poetry, and having a messed up home-life, Ginger is the sanest person you’ll meet in the movie, as you compare her to other characters, evidently struggling to cope with postwar life.

The acting is, quite honestly, impeccable. With Christina Hendricks, Annette Bening, Timothy Spall, Alessandro Nivola, and Oliver Platt on her flanks, there’s no wonder we’ve heard Chinese whispers that Elle will be nominated for an Oscar.

She’s 14 for crying out loud. I mean, what have I been doing with my life?

Seriously though, if you fancy dipping into the Sixties for a dose of rebellion and teenage life to get away from reality, watch this movie.

Beautifully shot and directed, it’s grubby and crumbling; just like we all imagine (and some remember) of London in 1962.

This coming-of-age tale recollects young friendship and how it’s lost, so if you’ve ever broken up with your best friend you’ll be able to relate to this one.

To view the trailer, and read an interview with writer Sally Potter, click here.

 
By Emma

 

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Emma Kelly is the Editor & Founder of Ginger Parrot. She dresses herself in mismatched multi-seasonal clothing and has a talent for sniffing out the next opportunity for coffee. She believes that any new band with a female musician is the next big thing and that whoever is currently dating Ryan Gosling is the luckiest lady on earth. Her biggest obsession is shopping online for castles, (probably) fueled by childish fantasies of finding her prince and settling down for a life of luxury, bathing in a pool of gin and bitter lemon. Other than that, though, she’ll be incessantly researching the latest gingerful news to deliver to Gingerkind.

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